Not Lost in Nice’s Old City

Once you plunge into the warren of narrow streets winding every which way, the road way also the sidewalk, the cafe tables all obstructing your path, the tall-ish buildings exaggerating the dark, narrow streets, you’d think it would be supremely easy to be lost-er than you’ve been since that day you spent six hours trying to get out of the Grand Bazaar (which you did, two carpets later). But no, the fix is simple. Proceed to the next intersection; look to your left; if you see high green hills, you are headed for the water and you are not lost. If you see only more narrow, dark, faintly foreboding alleyways, keep turning clockwise till you do see the green hills. You are now oriented.

The high hill once housed the Chateau that overlooked and protected the city below. Now it is a grand park and an overstuffed cemetery where the competition for the best guardian angel, the best inscription, the best view of the city is as keen as a serpent’s tooth. The city below, like so many medieval cities (and Roman and Greek cities before them), seems to be protected, but really any attack from the sea or from the plague or from down the road a piece is going to devastate the town while the chateau looks serenely on like that traveler on the Venetian ship who saw Icarus plunge into the sea and sailed on, doing nothing.

Anyway, I tried getting lost in the old city yesterday. I failed, so I hiked up the long hill, visited the park and the cemetery, and returned to a Provencal beef stew and grilled veggies, which turned out to be grilled and marinated red peppers bathed in olive oil and topped with local olives, giant capers, large chunks of fresh garlic, and anchovies (which I survived handsomely, thank you very much).

In the process of not getting lost, some pictures to show you the way.

 

 

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Entering the Warren

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Hill Rising to the Chateau

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Sneaking up on the Cathedral

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Voila! The Cathedral

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Scoping out the Ice Cream

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Order and Balance

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Nice Cathedral

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Good Lord! What a Program

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Third Story Garden

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Shutters

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Prickly Personality

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The Long Haul to the Chateau

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How a Tree Feels at the Top of the Climb

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Sneak Preview of the Cemetery

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Waterfall at 1/40th of a Second

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Same Waterfall: Droplets at 1/8000th of a Second. Nikons are Cool

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Cemetery Chapel

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The Dead Caryatid?

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The Bobbysoxer Was Ten a Hundred Years Ago

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Now We Call Him ‘Mister’

5 thoughts on “Not Lost in Nice’s Old City

  1. Really terrific photos … and here in the rough heartland where the oak savanna meets the prairie and the towns are sparse and flat – with the grain elevator being the high building. your stories of travels in the old world are even more delightful .

  2. Where’s my man Garibaldi then? And the sea?

    On Tue, Jul 12, 2016 at 3:02 AM, Letters from Orestes wrote:

    > pstambler posted: “Once you plunge into the warren of narrow streets > winding every which way, the road way also the sidewalk, the cafe tables > all obstructing your path, the tall-ish buildings exaggerating the dark, > narrow streets, you’d think it would be supremely easy to b” >

    • Amazing thing, Fred. Nice has a newish tram which makes a big loop that goes right through Garibaldi Square. The main roads replaced by the tram lines are now all pedestrian ways, so the square has virtually disappeared. There is also a new National Theatre on the same site as the Contemporary Art Museum from which I once photographed Garibaldi. I couldn’t see the statue any more. And I don’t recognize the architecture of the museum itself, though I was there 14 years ago. I need to study my old pictures.About the sea: I have a couple of shots from up high, but they didn’t make the cut.

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